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Posts Tagged ‘health’

Are you having phoney phun?

14/08/2013 3 comments

evil smiley

Some day soon (very soon, I hope), there will be a designated space set aside in restaurants, airports and other public places for those who just cannot survive without their cellphone phix. It took a long time for this to happen for smokers, but it finally did, once the realities of cigarette smoking could no longer be swept under the carpet.

We’re all still having too much phun with our phones to be bothered about health issues, and it’s going to take a phundamental shift in awareness or a very nasty collective wake-up call for this to change. But it’s not just about the harmful ephects of cellphone radiation; it’s about the respect, human connection and emotional presence that are being compromised in favour of being ‘connected’ to some person, in some place, about some thing other than what’s right in front of you. It’s a contagion of phragmentation that will have many more repercussions than losing a friend, not digesting your meal or missing a beautiful sunset.

Our electronic gadgets have also swept us up into a multi-tasking phrenzy. Our brains are not designed for this degree of processing, and multi-tasking not only reduces our productivity, our phocus and our problem-solving abilities; it also permanently damages our brain and makes us less smart. (Look up multi-tasking on the Internet to see just how damaging it is, but try not to do it when you’re in the middle of doing something else.)

For now, there seems to be no escape from the cellphone inphestation. Yesterday, I saw two young people sitting on the beach on a stunning summer’s day, heads together, talking intimately. As I got closer, though, I realized that they were both on their phones, texting pheverishly, ignoring each other, the eagle flying overhead, the beautiful clear water, and the antics of the one-year-old playing in the sand. (Unbeknownst to that little fella, he only has about another year left, before being directly hooked up to the source of the pandemic, although his thin little skull is already being bombarded by harmful radio waves from all sides.)

I hardly ever use my phone, but that doesn’t make much difference if you’re still using yours—beside me on the bus, beside me in the cinema, beside me in the restaurant, and beside me in every single café in town. If I went up to you in the restaurant, pulled back my hair and said, “Look. See this scar? This is from brain surgery to remove a tumour due to electromagnetic radiation“, would it change anything? I doubt it. You’d probably be annoyed that I’d interrupted you when you were trying to send a very important text. Besides, that kind of thing only happens to other people, right? Like lung cancer. Phunny. I used to think like that too.

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Are you switched on?

02/10/2012 5 comments

Isn’t it funny how we all desperately try not to repeat the mistakes our parents made? We’re determined to be emotionally available for our children, to protect them from bullying, abuse and second-hand smoke, and to feed them nutritious food.

But guess what we’re doing instead. We’re walking around with cellphones, while carrying our babies in a body sling. We’re exposing our youths and teenagers to harmful wi-fi radiation – not just at home but in schools, libraries and almost every other public place. And we’re wired for sound (and visuals and games) in every square foot of our homes and offices. Looking back at past generations, we may find it hard to believe that doctors used to promote cigarettes as being good for our health, and that tapeworms were sold as a great way to lose weight. But what will the next generation be thinking of us, when it becomes widely recognized that our high-tech gadgets are creating all kinds of health problems and fatal illnesses—not to mention killing off the birds and bees so essential to our food supply?

Headaches, abnormal heart rhythm, cancer, fatigue, MS, Parkinson’s disease, memory loss, tinnitus, digestive problems, difficulty sleeping and numerous other conditions that you’ve been unable to resolve (or may have attributed to stress)… these are all symptoms of electromagnetic sensitivity—the body’s physical reaction to the constant bombardment of electromagnetic fields and radio-wave radiation that permeate our living and working environments.

Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) is coming at us from every angle—from cell phones, cordless phones, wi-fi networks, Smart Meters, laptops, wireless keyboards/printers, kitchen appliances, electronic equipment, heating systems, and fluorescent lights. Not only that, but often the wiring in a house or building can contain what’s known as ‘dirty electricity’—a high-frequency current that produces magnetic fields that emanate from the walls into your living space, with the potential to cause numerous conditions, such as chronic fatigue syndrome, allergies, depression, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Lou Gehrig’s disease, attention deficit disorder, cancer, infertility, miscarriage and birth defects.

All of this and more is explained in Jim Waugh’s fascinating book on EMR (Living Safely with Electromagnetic Radiation—a complete guide to protecting your health), which is an eye-opener for those seeking an explanation for their health-related conundrums. Waugh shares numerous accounts of individuals whose debilitating conditions disappeared when the source of electromagnetic radiation was detected and removed. Pets, too, are seriously affected, with dogs, cats, horses and other animals succumbing to lameness, tumours, diarrhoea, skin diseases and paralysis—often because of a cordless phone in their owner’s home.

I need no further convincing of the importance of ‘cleaning’ up my act. Yet I realize that it’s another ‘inconvenient truth’. We all love our wonderful, labour-saving, mobility-enhancing technology, and none of us want to give it up.

What can you do to minimize the negative impact?

Here are some tips from Jim:

-Never leave an unused appliance plugged in as the cord/cable and socket will emit a strong electrical field. Don’t stand near them, either, when in use.

-Stand back from the electric elements on your stove, when turned on. They too emit a strong electrical field.

-Change all your so-called energy-saving CFLs back to incandescent bulbs – if you can (they will soon be banned for sale in Canada). CFLs emit harmful radiation (causing skin burns if placed too close to the body), and they contain toxic mercury. According to Walt McGinnis (see http://www.greenmuze.com/blogs/guest-bloggers/1031-the-dark-side-of-cfls.html), CFLs actually increase a consumer’s carbon footprint because they are energy hogs to produce, operate and dispose of.

-Never sleep with an electrical cable or plug behind or near your head – such as the cord from a bedside lamp going behind your bed to reach a socket. The electrical field can disrupt sleep and other body functions. Check appliances on the other side of your bedroom wall for any appliances plugged in there – for the same reason.

-Use a separate keyboard with your laptop, if possible. Using the built-in keyboard exposes you to a strong electrical field.

-Switch from a cordless phone to a corded one. This may not be easy or convenient to do, but numerous health problems have been associated with the use of cordless phones—among pets as well as humans. Cordless phones use the same kind of pulsed microwave radiation as cell phones and are known to be more dangerous because they operate 24 hours a day, even when the handset is not in use.

-At night, turn off your wi-fi and all other appliances not in use.

-Never charge your cell phone in your bedroom. During the day, avoid putting it in a breast/hip pocket, if possible. Keep cell phones away from babies and small children as they are much more susceptible to the harmful radiation than adults.

-Be mindful of others around you and how they may be affected by your techno-gadgets.

In Sweden, EMF sensitivity is officially recognized as a disability, and the government provides benefits as well as designated EMF-free areas for those who are affected. While Swedish brains are presumably no different from ours, they certainly seem to be a whole lot smarter.

For more info, see emfsafehome.com

Should I humour this tumour?

24/05/2012 16 comments

Not many of my friends (and none of my clients) know this… but I have a brain tumour. I say that in the same way that I’d say I’ve got a house guest—and I think of it like that too. It has taken up temporary residence inside my brain while I figure out the purpose of its visit.

I know it’s a messenger, and if I don’t figure out the message within the next 3 months, it will either get evicted by surgery or nuked out of existence. But if it’s a diligent messenger with a mission of guaranteed delivery—a bit like FedEx—then it may well pay me another visit to make sure I get the message. And if my own stubbornness is anything to go by, it probably won’t quit till its job is done.

So I’m looking at the options: with surgery, I’d be left with a trapdoor in my skull after the surgeon saws through my tough noggin to reach the intruder—with unknowable consequences; with radiation, I’d be left with a crusty ‘raisin’ that may or may not re-inflate itself to the size of a grape—or maybe even a plum—and possibly in a more aggressive, attention-seeking form.

With those images in mind, I’m quite motivated to crack this on my own and to find a natural solution. It won’t be the first time I’ve had insights from illness, so I recognize the value of digging deeper. And this tumour is prompting me to go deeper than ever before. With my focus on empowerment, I’m also committed to resolving conundrums—and I’ve had many in my own life, pushing me to look at the underlying dynamics. Yet when I started my online research, I was amazed to discover that there were no online stories of anyone curing this kind of tumour (a benign acoustic neuroma) in a natural way. Think about that. There are hundreds of cases of people successfully curing all forms of malignant cancer through natural means—but not one single online report of a natural cure for a benign acoustic neuroma (none that I could find, at least).

Obviously, I’ll have to find my own way. Like many, I explored the conventional approach first and was presented with the limited, invasive options: surgery or radiation. As I sat there, listening to the neurosurgeon explain the pros and cons of either option, I was aware of my growing frustration. The hearing loss on the right side is permanent and irreversible. You may end up with facial paralysis and you may lose movement on the right side of your face. You may not be able to close your eye—but we’ll give you some special weights to put in the eyelid to help with that. With radiation, the tumour may come back and it could be cancerous. With surgery, we can’t say what may be affected but, for sure, your hearing will go and there’s the risk of death. But if you don’t get either surgery or radiation, you’ll die anyway, if the tumour keeps growing at the current rate…   

It wasn’t just his lack of compassion that bothered me; after all, it’s probably a good thing for a surgeon to be able to operate fairly robotically, without getting all worked up and emotional (I wouldn’t want him snivelling or sobbing uncontrollably while wielding a scalpel inside my brain). It was the fact that there was absolutely no enquiry into the underlying reason for the tumour occurring in the first place—plus he didn’t listen to what I had to say. He had his spiel, and that was it; the readings from his high-tech equipment overrode what I was feeling. So when I told him that I was starting to experience the same symptoms on the other side of my head, he said the MRI showed nothing on the left side and that I was imagining it.

That prompted me to tell him a little story. For years, I had a stabbing pain in my right eye. I consulted eye specialists in Switzerland and in Canada but they all said the same thing: there’s nothing there. Finally, in desperation, I went to Emergency and was referred to another specialist—a young Asian woman who… wait for it… pulled a piece of metal out of my eye. For seven years, I walked around with that piece of metal in my eye because… well, there was nothing there. (I think all those other ophthalmologists needed to get their eyes tested.)

But I knew where this indifference was designed to take me—and it worked. When I left the neurosurgeon’s office, a healthy dose of self-responsibility had reasserted itself and I was on a mission. I was going to fix this myself, if it was the last thing I did (and, yes, I did see the irony in that).

This got me thinking about my rights—not just as the host of this unwelcome guest in my headspace, but also as a person who’s supposedly in charge of her own circumstances. That is, after all, what I teach others and what I strive to practise in my own life. So I asked myself what I was entitled to that I wasn’t giving myself. What was I not doing? And it occurred to me that maybe what I was not doing was… not doing. Rather than doing more, I needed to not do certain things. (I needed to cut things out of my life—before the surgeon needed to cut things out of my skull.) I needed more head space. Things were getting too crowded in there. I needed to download some data rather than uploading even more.

So I started doing less, thinking less and just letting things be. I could feel that the tumour was agitated by too much mental activity and I realized it was pushing me to be still. My brain wanted peace. Reflecting on my daily routine, I saw that there was precious little stillness—in body or mind. Yes, I meditated and did some yoga; otherwise, though, I was constantly doing, thinking, moving, analysing, talking, planning, creating and working my mind. With all our techno-gadgets, our brains are constantly over-stimulated. We’re bombarded with e-mails, texts, commercials, traffic and hordes of other equally hyperactive bods; our sensitive electrical systems are constantly assaulted by mobile phones, cordless phones, TV screens in every café, ipods, ipads and wireless networks 24/7. And we wonder why we’re sick or why we can’t sleep, focus, concentrate or keep going for 15 hours every day.

So stillness, ease and peace have become my focus, and things have started to flow. I’ve received gifts of bodywork, hands-on healing, laughter, emotional support, and a session with an amazing alternative healthcare practitioner who has actually cured someone of an acoustic neuroma, using natural means. I’ve started his programme, while maintaining my own regimen of yoga, chi gung, relaxation, sitting in nature and being more creative with food.

The mind still wants to be in charge, of course, and I resisted sharing this information, for fear of being seen as weak or of not practising what I preach in my work. But the wiser part of me knows that most of my wisdom and expertise has come from addressing challenges like this, rather than trying to deny or suppress them.

So watch this space… while I monitor the space inside my head—and hopefully both will soon get filled up with some really good stuff.